HDIM Reviews: Osmosis (2019) & The Questions It Makes Us Ask About Love

Love is complex and most of the time complicated. But what if you could control it, turn emotions into tangible data, know 100% if someone is your one true love, your soulmate? That’s what Osmosis is running with to lure you in. What you get in return is an intriguing study of what happens when you try to control love.

osmosis title card

You can expect some partial nudity and floating sex art #itiswhatitis, some arguments about love and our expectations of it, plot twists that don’t really contribute to the story but are fun nonetheless, a strong start but a weak finish and a lot of really insecure adults who do not have the maturity to handle love much alone to deserve it.

What is Osmosis?

Spoilers Ahead!

Osmosis is the name of a company run by two siblings, Paul and Esther, the former, the CEO and alpha tester of the technology, the latter, the engineer behind the technology. Their mother is in a coma. Esther is trying to find a way to revive her. In the meantime, it’s Paul and Esther against the world.

paul and esther
Paul and Esther (Osmosis)

However, Osmosis is in the line of matchmaking, more precisely in helping you find your soulmate, your one true love. In a nutshell, you take an implant (essentially a pill you can swallow) which releases nanobots into your brain.

There, the bots retrieve signals from your subconscious, then feed it to the company’s A.I., Martin who will then scour the social networks in the world to find your soulmate for you. Tough luck if your soulmate isn’t tech savvy, I guess. Once you have found your soulmate, the system then guides you towards meeting your soulmate.

finding your soulmate
What would you do for love?

In the name of research, they get feedback from inside your body in return: your hormone levels, your heart rate, whether you are stressed or happy or relaxed – sounds intrusive, what could go wrong?

The Beta Testers Find “True Love”

In the first few episodes, we follow the beta testers throughout the process. There are 12 testers, but the storyline follows only the processes of Lucas, Ana and Neils, a last minute beta tester who was added in by Esther. Via the testers, the show makes you question the various aspects of the seeking out of your soulmate.

What if your soulmate is bad for you?

Lucas is in a healthy relationship with a restaurant owner, Antoine, who is a rising star in the culinary world. Lucas has everything going for him but wonders if there is more to life and joined Osmosis to prevent himself from one day waking up in bed and thinking “what if I’m not with my soulmate?”

lucas beta tester
Lucas thinks too much

Osmosis tells him that his soulmate is his ex, a philanderer who not only sleeps around but had left him in a wreck before Antoine helped him pull it together again. And what does Lucas do? He goes with his ex, of course, because we all make stupid mistakes all the time for the benefit of storylines.

What if your soulmate is out of your league?

Ana is a sweet, soft-spoken but insecure young woman who has body issues that she hasn’t actively dealt with. Osmosis to her is her final chance at love. If she can’t find a soulmate, then she won’t embrace love anymore, and that will be it. At least then, she knows to stop looking.

ana beta tester
Ana wants to find love too

Ana’s soulmate turns out to be a personal trainer. That probably explains why she had a hard time finding him. She signs up for his training program and they meet. Simon is sweet on her, and encouraging instead of disparaging, basically a ray of sunshine in her otherwise uneventful life.

simon soulmate
Simon, ultimate boyfriend material

Here’s where the logic breaks down for me. She is pessimistic, he is the opposite. She has no self control or self discipline, he has both. She has little to offer the relationship, he could have any girl he wanted (just being honest). There is little logic to explain how the two of them could be soulmates, so the show doesn’t really try to explain it. Enjoy the irony, guys. Let’s move on.

What if you are not good for your soulmate?

Neils is a teenage, self-declared sex addict who failed to get into the program at first but got in via Esther, with the help of his very supportive mother. He wants to find a soulmate so that he could find someone that can motivate him enough to change. Because if your supportive mother who had not kicked you out of the house upon finding out you have some troubling issues with sex could not motivate you enough to change, a soulmate probably will. #flipstable

neils beta tester
Neils has a problem

Anyhoo, he gets into the program when one of the beta testers chickened out and of course his soulmate, Claire was unexpected. She’s pretty, loves art, is fun to be around and simply adorable.

claire soulmate
Claire is definitely soulmate material, but for Neils?

HOLD YOUR HORSES, buster.

Why would a minor need to find a soulmate? Who lets minors find soulmates? Who lets minors with a sex problem find soulmates? Weird parents, that’s who. Weird parents and irresponsible companies that subscribe to the idea that you are never too young to find a soulmate. What the what?

And what happens? Neils attacks Claire albeit in a fugue state and then his parents activated Parenting Mode and came to talk some sense into Osmosis with a threat to sue.

What if Your Soulmate Wants Out?

Major spoilers!

For this one, we need to go back to Paul. He also has an implant put inside him by Esther but he isn’t a beta tester. He’s actually the alpha tester to the technology, which awoke him from a comatose state and found him his soulmate, Josephine.

Josephine soulmate
The Alpha Soulmate

Josephine goes missing in the first episode. Paul tries to find her with his implant, which is connected to her own implant. It fails to tell her where she is. He lodges a police report and is led on a wild goose chase before Josephine returns to his side with a bombshell revelation: she had her implant removed. And she went to great lengths to get it done, almost flatlining in the process.

Josephine at the brink of death

Understandably, Paul freaks out. For one thing, he had been scared for her life for the past few days. Secondly, this spells disaster for the company. Paul and Josephine were the ultimate couple that would sell the idea of Osmosis: the first pair of soulmates that started it all (it’s their bodies on the title card, for heaven’s sake!).

But then we get an explanation from Josephine as to why she could no longer live with the implant. With it, she had lost control of her own thoughts, privacy and freedom and Paul, who is essentially a narcissistic prick, refuses to entertain the idea of giving them back to her in exchange for her promise of love.

For him, it is not enough that she tells him she loves him; he needs the nanobots inside her body to prove it to him with figures and charts and such. Whilst she did not leave him, for him, removing the implant is the equivalent (insecure much?). The relationship is as good as over without the implants.

I find the idea of using the implant as a metaphor for the trust between a couple profound and clearcut. How do you prove your love for your better half? Facts and figures would probably do the trick. “I love you this much out of 100%” but then you would need some sort of input to compute that final amount.

How receptive are you of the idea that in order for you to prove how much you love someone, you need to open up your deepest, darkest thoughts and feelings to them?

But then, beyond this point, the writers do little to resolve this thing between Josephine and Paul beyond putting a pregnancy into the picture. And that’s that.

Oh, wait! We haven’t talked about Esther.

Finding Love In All The Wrong Places

It is entirely impossible to talk about Esther’s storyline without releasing a lot of major spoilers. If you have plans to watch Osmosis, please stop here.

First off, Esther is not a likeable character. In fact, she is extremely hard to love. The only part that is human about her is that she devotes her entire existence towards recreating her miracle work on her brother; this time, on their mother.

esther and louise
Esther and Louise, her mother

It wasn’t specified how long Louise, the mother, had been comatose. But in all that time, Esther was the only one sitting by her bedside at the hospital. Paul, on the other hand, couldn’t care less for their mother. For all he cares, she could just die and he’d wash his hands clean of her. And yet, when she finally awakens from her coma, she asks for Paul and does not recognise Esther.

In Episode 6, desperate Esther takes Louise to their old home where Martin shows Louise a piece of her own memory.

esther goes home

Esther finally finds out why Louise could not recognise her. Esther isn’t really her daughter. She’s a replacement girl brought in to replace the real Esther who had died in a swimming pool accident. Louise had not been able to cope with the loss of her daughter that she took a poor girl into her home, brainwashed the girl into believing that she had been Louise’s daughter all her life, and hits Paul when he refuses to play along with this insanity. Esther fuelled by her rage euthanises her mother since Paul refuses to.

And that’s… still not the end of it all.

It’s not true that Esther is hard to love. Although her whole life is falling apart, she has one entity that will do anything for her, Martin. Yup, the A.I. that she created and the key component of Osmosis. And he looks like this.

martin the AI
That insect lamp is Martin. Yup.

In an attempt to make Esther take an implant, Martin puts all the beta testers into a coma. Esther enters Osmosis to save them and Martin professes his love to her and asks her to stay. Which she did because otherwise the beta testers may stay in a coma forever, and Osmosis could not launch. #priorities

With Esther, the question they are making you ask is Would it be so bad if your soulmate is not human? That one is up to you guys to think about. Just kidding. Esther escapes Martin in a last minute plot twist. Because even the writers don’t think Esther should be confined in a virtual world for the sake of love. Sounds like love isn’t really the be all, end all thing it is put out to be.

Like I said, it started out strong but finished weak. Still, it was a fun exercise into understanding people’s expectations of love and what they are willing to give up in order to find it.